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A STORY TOLD 

THREAD BY THREAD

HAND-CRAFTED ACCESSORIES FROM THE WAYUU TRIBE IN COLOMBIA.​

 THE JOURNEY

WAYUU HERITAGE

The Wayuu people are an indigenous group from the Guajira desert in Colombia and Venezuela. Unconsciously we have all have been exposed to the artisan goods of the tribe, woven bursts of colour in bracelets, bags, hammock and straw hats, and bags.  Müsü wants to shine a light on the original artist and bring authentic Wayuu products back to the European market.

MUSU FOCUSES ON WOMEN

MÜSÜ bags are a product made by women for women.  The Wayuu mochila-making culture is centred around feminine power and intelligence. Wayuu women spend 7-20 days handcrafting one mochila bag which each has a unique design on the bottom signature of the artisan.

Your purchase helps to provide Wayuu communities what they need most. At the moment, we use a part of the profits for Medical Care for Indigenous tribes in South America.

SUMMER COLLECTION

SPRING SUMMER 2020

The Wayuu would rise at dawn and find themselves impressed with Wale’Kerü’s craft.

Despite the community's desire to learn, the spider would not give away her secret. One night, a young girl reached out and begged the spider to unveil her tricks. They would meet every night, and Wale’Kerü taught her all she could. And when there wasn’t more to teach, the spider disappeared.

The little girl, by then a woman, showed her fellows the knitting techniques, much like Wale’Kerü had done her. The spider’s legacy became a symbol of the Wayuu, now caught between their ethos and the trades of western society.

SHE’D ONLY COME OUT AT NIGHT,

SHE’D KNIT HAMMOCKS, STRAPS AND BAGS.

THE MOON WAS HER ONLY SOURCE OF LIGHT

AND SHE’D ALWAYS LEAVE BEFORE IT TURNED BRIGHT

 

THE MYTH OF WALE’KER, THE SPIDER WHO TAUGHT KNITTING TO THE WAYUU.

Their culture and language are well preserved, and their land remained untouched by Spanish colonists who could not fight in the desert. However, recent times are challenging local resistance to acculturation. While the authorities have sat in silence, armed groups have pervaded La Guajira, and corporations have contaminated rivers that are sacred and central to the Wayuu’s wellbeing.

In 2004, the Bahía Portete massacre at the hands of paramilitaries displaced over 400 Wayuu people. To this day, the case of Cerrejón still stands out - a key coal producer whose mining activities reportedly depleted and polluted Río Ranchería.